Submission Open for IJEER Volume-3, Number-4, April 2019 | Submission Deadline- 20 April, 2019

International Journal for Empirical Education and Research

Human Rights in Contemporary Context of Bangladesh

Author: Ekhlasur Rahman | Published on: 2019-04-14 22:38:12   Page: 50-74   8

Abstract
Bangladesh considers that hunger, poverty, illiteracy which characterize underdevelopment to be formidable impediments, which frustrate the effective enjoyment of human rights. Removal of these impediments through mutual co-operation is, therefore, vital for the full realization of the aims and objectives of the Universal Declaration of the Human Rights. Bangladesh is pleased to note that the Vienna Declaration adopted in June 1993 at the conclusion of the World Conference on Human Rights highlighted the universal character and the indivisibility of human rights as well as reiterated the fact that existence of extreme poverty inhibits the full and effective enjoyment of human rights and that its immediate alleviation and eventual elimination must remain a high priority for the international community. Bangladesh pledged its total commitment and unwavering support to the United Nations for its continuing efforts in promoting dignity and worth of the human person and for full realization of the principles. Parliament in Bangladesh is sovereign and democratic polity is being given a permanent shape through institution building. A policy decision has been taken at the highest level of the government to ensure women their rightful share in the society. There are 30 reserved seats for women in national parliament and quotas have been fixed for them in government jobs. Stringent laws have been enacted to protect women from social evils and to ensure their rights. Steps have also been taken for the economic empowerment of women.

Keywords
Source; Minorities; Constitution; Trafficking; Rights; Background.

Cite this Article

×

Rahman, E. (2017), Human Rights in Contemporary Context of Bangladesh. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research, 1(4), 50-74.

  • Download Citation
  • ×

    Rahman, E. (2017) "Human Rights in Contemporary Context of Bangladesh", International Journal For Empirical Education and Research, 1(4), pp.50-74.

  • Download Citation
  • ×

    Rahman, E.. Human Rights in Contemporary Context of Bangladesh. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(4): 50-74.

  • Download Citation
  • ×

    Appeared

    ×

    Appeared

    ×

    Rahman, E.. Human Rights in Contemporary Context of Bangladesh. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(4): 50-74.

  • Download Citation
  • ×

    Rahman, E.. Human Rights in Contemporary Context of Bangladesh. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(4): 50-74.

  • Download Citation

  • Reference

    1. UNFPA (2003) ‘Violence against Women in South Asia – A Regional Analysis’,Kathmand
    2. Governance/Bangladesh-national-human-rights-commission.
    3. Constitution of Bangladesh
    4. Human-rights-condition-in-Bangladesh.
    5. http://www.nhrc.org.bd/site/page/1c65dfa1-f9c2-48e9-a66b-eab8de75d9b1/
    6. http://www.bd.undp.org/content/bangladesh/en/home/operations/projects/democratic_governance/bangladesh-national-human-rights-commission.htm
    7. Book of human right commission
    8. Organization of African Unity Convention governing the specific aspects of refugee problems in Africa (10 September 1969) 1001 UNTS 45.
    9. Kuruk, P., 'Asylum and the Non-Refoulement of Refugees: The case of the missing shipload of Liberian refugees' (1999) 35 Sian.J.Int'1 £.313, 332.
    10. European Convention on Human Rights (4 November 1950) 213 UNTS 221.
    11. Drafted by the European Convention and solemnly proclaimed on 7 December 2000 by the European Parliament, the Councilof Ministers and the European Commission. However its then legal status was uncertain and it did not have full legal effect until the entry into force of the TreatyofLisbonon 1 December 2009.
    12. American Convention on Human Rights (18 July 1978) 1144 UNTS 123.
    13. Adopted by the United Nations General Assemblyon 20 December 2006 and opened for signature on 6 February 2007. It entered into force on 23 December 2010.
    14. While the 'persecution' is not defined in humanitarian law, it refers as a minimum, to serious violations of human rights (right to life, freedom and security) on such grounds as ethnicity, nationality, religion or political opinion. See Article 1 of the 1951 Refugee Convention; UNHCR Handbook Procedures United Kingdom Border Agency. Asylum Policy Instructions (October 2006) \5.;see, for example. O v Independent Federal Asylum Board (UBAS) (26 September 2007) Case 1282: Administrative Court (Austria), Case no.2006/19/0521 (translation by Anne Kallies).   
    15. Allain, Jean (2001): ‘The jus cogens Nature of non-refoulement’, International Journal of Refugee Law 13, 533-558. Betlehem, Elihu and Lauterpacht, Daniel (2003): ‘the scope and content of the principle of non-refoulement: Opinion.’ In: Erika Feller, Volker Türk and Frances Nicholson (eds.): Refugee Protection in International Law: UNHCR's Global

    [This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).]

    DOI


    Author Details


    Ekhlasur Rahman
    Department of Law
    Rajshahi University
    ekhlasrahman23@gmail.com